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20121207
20121207
STATION
SFGTV 3
CNNW 2
CSPAN 2
CNBC 1
FBC 1
KQED (PBS) 1
SFGTV2 1
LANGUAGE
English 14
Search Results 0 to 13 of about 14 (some duplicates have been removed)
those nice shrubs need fear to go begging for a garden and have humbaba in his treachery ilk. those plants and flowers were like books everyone could read, not cut and throw away. their different fantastic colors had formed our blood so our veins ran smoothly, our 7 wonders showed. then humbaba made a whirlwind of fire and snow. who crowned him king? who showed him our garden was but a jail? humbaba was great and scary, but not so very strong, though no one could ever conquer him as no one would ever try. time and again, when things grew old, humbaba alone believed himself eternal and young, still powerful, able to defeat all. humbaba didn't want to know one fact: that accumulation will lead to eruptive change. but, sadly, when suddenly he realized it after all, he chose to check its power on all, the tall. he crushed all the shrubs and plants leaving them creeping and broken all over. he damaged the flowers and colors, the flowers withered, their leaves all burned and soon they were throwing their seeds every which way and when the whole orchard changed into a dry, gray waste, humb
't know what the consequences and side effects are" and this is not as serious as that, but it begs the question to make sure that the language is understandable english and in addition i don't think you're limiting the mailers just to the three languages of chinese, english and spanish; right? >> no, i don't think so. >> so you're including whatever languages are used by the city and county of san francisco in the distribution of election ballots for
the homeless out reach team who deal with this over and over. and i beg you, please, do not allow tasers. thank you. >> thank you very much. next speaker. i want to ask the police department to learn the side step when someone is coming towards you, with a knife, you learn the side step. i'm disabled and 79, and can do the side step, tasers and guns are not just about equal, or just about equal in the damage that they do to humans, not acceptable, period. the side step. >> and someone is approaching you with a little knife do the side step, thank you. >> next speaker please? >> michael lion, san francisco, gray panthers are absolutely against the use of tasers by the police in any kind of way. i particularly object to the calling them non-lethal. what you are asking to do is to have a police officer make a snap judgment on the medical condition of someone that they are about to tase. i look fairly hail and hearty, but i have had a triple by pass, who is to make a judgment on me? are tasers necessary for this? i would say, no. psych tech, works in a job where we are working with mentally ill peo
this dispute about legitimate rape is i begged for the investigators to give me a polygraph test. they said they couldn't. so i'd like your help with getting a law passed on the federal and state level so that witnesses and those accused of sexual assault domestic violence have a mandatory polygraph or state of the art go to the f.b.i. on how you can detect lies. victims have theè:xáÑ opposite. while it might not be used in court it would help the investigators so they're not wasting time on false claims and so people9j%( ic-hat are harmed are helped. so i look forward to continuing our communication helping me resolve injustice in your county and helping you resolve injustice in mine. >> president chiu: thank you very muchajq . >> good afternoon, supervisors. and best regards to mayor -- to the mayor. did not moses give you the law? yet none of you keeps theejpz& law. why you looking for an opportunity to kill me? the crowd answered, you have a$ d demon. who is trying to kill you. jesus answered them i performed
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whether it's going to give new jobs or not. we know oklahoma -- there has beg a number of studies done in oklahoma it did not produce additional jobs. as a matter of fact, if you draw a comparison to two years before, the 10 years after, it's actually less investment in oklahoma. it's bad for michigan it's bad for anywhere. >> all right. >> right to work is about lessening worker's voice in government and the workplace. >> if it's not about economic development, is it more of a political action against the progressive movement? >> i absolutely thingk it is. we have seen all kinds of voter suppression, suppression of democratic rights. this is another example. the wealthy -- this is really driven by wealthy forces in michigan that you know well, the debos. family others dick debos, and they want the wealthy to get more and more and the workers to get less and less to try to push us down to third-world level on wages and benefits. it's outrage ooze. it shows the tremendous -- actually we did him 10 days of really fruitful discussions about how to change the
, they can't afford dinner. please have mercy, they beg. on the street, we meet four boys. they ask if we think it is safe enough for them to go back home. they talk of tanks firing and seeing other children lose limbs. they say what they've witnessed has made them all decide to be doctors, to save the victims of war. >> arwa is still with us. when the folks in syria hear you're from cnn, what's their basic message to you, specifically to the united states, to president obama? i'm sure they've got some words they want to share. >> reporter: they most certainly do. they want to know why it is that the u.s. has effectively stayed silent so long, they want to know why the u.s. is not supporting the syrian opposition, why the u.s. allowed the conflict to degenerate to such degree now they deal with islamist groups. they want to know why the u.s. seems to be okay with the fact that so many people have died so far and allowed the suffering to really continue, because even when it comes to humanitarian aid, for example, there's very little of that that's actually coming in. this issue of the ris
email the president of guatemala beg him to allow the court system to proceed to determine my status in guatemala and please support the political asylum i'm asking for. please, please be very polite in your communications and i thank you. by all appear appearances at government of guatemala has made up his mind as soon as mcafee is out of the hospital e. will be on a plane headed back to belize. >> bill: he will need more than software. phil cight, thanks. still searching for a driver who ran over a helpless little girl and took off leaving her in the middle of the road. it happened earlier this week and surveillance cameras captured it. you will see the 7-year-old wander into the street and then the suv just slams right into her, drags her down the street before her mother and sister run over to try to help. >> he should have known that he hit somebody. he didn't stop. he didn't render aid. >> it was somebody's sister, she lives down the street. the car instead of stopping, he just left. >> shepard: he just left. she is in the hospital. injuries to her head and body. police say she
there once in jordan in 1997 mossad agents poisoned him. king hussein begged benjamin netanyahu for the antidote. and israel's leader then as now eventually handed it over. meshaal backed a steady stream of suicide bombings which israel's separation wall has largely stopped and the hamas earlier this year, meshaal left his home damascus abandoning the assad regime to its fate. he's also making peace overtures to president abbas, his palestinian rival in the west bank. >> -- hamas government in gaza. >> and the hamas leader may still be a wanted man. palestinian police have been rehearsing the drill for any assassination attempt. >> is >> sreenivasan: israel and the u.s. consider hamas a terror organization. the israelis had little to say about today's visit. the death toll has passed 500 in the typhoon that smashed into the philippines on tuesday, with more than 400 people still missing. rescuers dug through mud and debris again today, to retrieve bodies in the hardest hit compostela valley region. some 250 people died there. more than 300,000 others lost their homes in the stor
, this woman tells us. if someone has breakfast, they can't afford dinner. please, have mercy, they beg. on the street we meet four boys. they ask if we think it's safe enough for them to go back home. they talk of tanks firing and seeing other children lose limbs. they say what they witnessed has made them all decide to be doctors to save the victims of war. >> arwa damon on the ground in northern syria, and she's joining us live via skype, and, arwa, it is just amazing to see the slees of life, what is taking place there on the ground. it barely seems like people are able to cope in any kind of normal fashion. when you go from village to village or family to family, do you get a sense at all that there's an end game here, that they see an end and a way that they can pick up their lives and move on, or this is just the way they're going to exist for quite some time? >> it's so difficult to put into words, suzanne, exactly what it is that these families have been going through. many of them are so frustrated, they're so angry. just earlier today, for example, we were in aleppo once agai
linda was begging homebuilders to hire sfrunlts the job corps program. >> there was nothing going on. >> now they're in high demand and they know it. >> there's a resurgence in construction, so i know this is the place to be. >> housing starts climb to an annualized rate after falling to a low of just around half a million in 2009 when the industry and the trade were decimated. >> over 2 million workers left the construction industry, and most of those are not coming back, so we have a great need to have skilled workers. >> with instructors from the nonprofit home building institute these students learn plumbing, weatherization, painting, all the construction skills you would see on a residential or commercial site. so the big question is why did all those workers who left not come back? well, remember, this housing recession has been going on for almost five years now and a lot of them have retrained into other careers. another point to make that is very important, if we go over the fiscal cliff, not only will the housing recovery come to a grinding halt, but programs like this one,
and demanding closure of guantanamo beg for years and years but no one, and none of these do-gooder's talks about human rights in iran. where are these good people? those good people who talk about human rights in secular regimes in the middle east have totally forgotten us. i have an idea of why this is. i believe that many of them are communists. they still are even after the end of the cold war, they are communists. the only side with the enemies of the united states. they believe that the enemy of my enemy is my friends of the islamic republic of iran is critical to the united states, then they are a friend of me teaching at berkeley. >> how did you come up with that? >> was pure accident. that is such a shame but use your experiences from the years of the cold war. try to engage some of the people who showed the united states government during the cold war how to wage cultural warfare. not only the people who manage to make "dr. zhivago" to a movie. why is there no iranian "dr. zhivago?" you have to wage war against not only those who are not your enemies but opponents of the vast majo
support systems, and it is not a new problem. it is frankly getting worse going forward. that begs the question of, yes, we need to reform the education system, particularly focusing on middle school, but we also have to recognize, as steve mentioned, one of the opportunities and challenges of the internet is that has made space and distance and time in effect disappear in terms of the change. you can build it anywhere. if you can build it anywhere, that means america has international companies with footprints everywhere, and microsoft and google and aol can choose where to locate. if they're not getting enough american talent, it will relocate. one last point, many of these younger people are still being trained at our universities. oftentimes, they're not so much going back home, many are just driving north to toronto, canada, where there is a much easier visa system. >> steve, people say the problem is not just that it cannot the talent in the u.s. but that it costs more. that this is about a less- expensive alternative. >> no, i don't think that is true. i think it is also the
Search Results 0 to 13 of about 14 (some duplicates have been removed)